The InRhythm™ Program – Inhaled Antiarrhythmic for PAF

A breath of fresh air for
Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation patients.

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most commonly encountered, sustained cardiac arrhythmia in clinical practice. The risk of developing AF increases with age and tends to be higher in males than in females. The disease presents a wide spectrum of symptoms and severity AND it is progressive. The global prevalence of AF is estimated to be 34 million patients, which is expected to increase substantially as the general population ages. Paroxysmal AF accounts for approximately 27%-39% of all diagnosed cases of AF. In the US, up to 6 million people have AF1-3. AF accounts for > $26B annually in U.S. healthcare costs, approximately 40% of which are hospital-related4-5.

Approved treatments for PAF are either chronic administration of oral antiarrhythmic drugs or acute procedures requiring an ER or hospital visit (intravenous drugs or electrical cardioversion). Repeated or prolonged atrial fibrillation (AF) episodes are associated with reduced quality of life, progression of atrial fibrillation episodes, heart failure, higher rates of stroke and, often, the need for interventional procedures such as ablation. The ideal PAF treatment would be available wherever/whenever a PAF episode occurs and would return patients to normal sinus rhythm as quickly as possible while minimizing overall drug exposure.

Learn More about Atrial Fibrillation

InRhythm™, a Patient-Administered, Inhaled Antiarrhythmic for Acute Treatment of Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation (PAF)

InRhythm, our lead program under development, is studying an inhaled therapy to treat symptomatic paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF) using an approved antiarrhythmic drug.

  • Advantages of Inhaled Therapy for AF

  • 1. Patient self-administered, allowing for fast, convenient treatment anywhere
    2. Therapy can be initiated earlier, at the first signs of an episode, thus reducing disabling symptoms and/or possibly avoiding ER visits and hospitalizations
    3. Rapidly absorbed through the lung and delivered to the heart
    4. Rapid onset and conversion to normal sinus rhythm
    5. Low drug dose and short duration of action, to minimize potential side effects

The Atrial Fibrillation Epidemic

Prevalence of Atrial Fibrillation and flutter (per 100,000) by region, 20103
Atrial Fibrillation Prevalence – Globally

34M patients

PAF without structural heart disease:

~11 – 12M patients

PAF patients with multiple weekly episodes:

~1M patients

AF causes:

15 – 20% of all ischemic strokes

The incidence of AF is projected to grow significantly over the coming years; driven by aging populations and other heart conditions that cause AF like hypertension, diabetes, obesity, etc.

Significant unmet medical need still exists in atrial fibrillation treatment. Approved treatments for PAF are either chronic administration of oral anti-arrhythmic drugs or acute procedures requiring an ER or hospital visit (intravenous drugs or electrical cardioversion). Repeated or prolonged atrial fibrillation (AF) episodes are associated with reduced quality of life, progression of atrial fibrillation episodes, heart failure, higher rates of stroke and, often, the need for interventional procedures such as ablation. The ideal PAF treatment would be available wherever/whenever a PAF episode occurs and would return patients to normal sinus rhythm as quickly as possible while minimizing overall drug exposure.

1.Go AS, Hylek EM, Phillips KA, Chang Y, Henault LE, Selby JV, et al. Prevalence of diagnosed atrial fibrillation in adults: national implications for rhythm management and stroke prevention: the AnTicoagulation and Risk Factors in Atrial Fibrillation (ATRIA) Study. JAMA 2001;285(18):2370-5.
2. January CT, Wann LS, Alpert JS, Calkins H, Cigarroa JE, Cleveland JC, Jr., et al. 2014 AHA/ACC/HRS guideline for the management of patients with atrial fibrillation: executive summary: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on practice guidelines and the Heart Rhythm Society. Circulation 2014;130(23):2071-104.
3. Chugh SS, Roth GA, Gillum RF, Mensah GA, Glob Heart. 2014 Mar;9(1):113-9
4. Kim MH et al, Circ CV Qual Outcomes 2011
5. Reynolds et al, 2007;JCV EP;18:628

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